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into hands because we are sick of it. and, you know, what i would like to tell john boehner is don't give in to this craziness. this is nothing but craziness. and i watched harry reid yesterday. you know, he talked and he talked and he really said nothing. then he went on about dance, dance, dance and i thought to myself all you do is dance around with these bills that they send. the house will have a bill, they send it to the senate and what does he do? dances around it and never addresses it. >> host: know by partisanship than for you? >> caller: no, absolutely none. then when he left the stage and was walking off, the man -- i feel bad for him that he just can't get it together -- he grabbed ahold of the flag. he was falling. then he grabbed ahold of low wall and at that point i said uh oh that man needs to go home. he's too old to be there. he doesn't do his job and is collecting a big paycheck. >> host: we covered that news conference. you probably watched it on c-span, go over to the site, c-span.org if you want to watch the entire press conference with senate majority leader harry
john boehner has some basis for saying that if the president has a mandate so do house republicans. the popular vote for the house republicans will probably come out to something like the same 50-48 by which obama beat romney. that hasn't been fully tabulated yet. back about 20 years ago, circa 1990, political scientists and pundits said the republicans have a lock on the presidency and the democrats had a lock on the house and they had all sorts of good reasons why this was so. the democrats picked the lock on the presidency in 1992 and republicans broke the lock on the house in 1994. starting with those elections democrats have won four of the six presidential elections and plurality of the popular vote and other republicans have won majorities in six out of eight elections for the house of representatives. so, it is eight out of 10 in the house of representatives. looking back from 2014, back 20 years, 21994 we will have had during that period for 10 years a democratic president and a republican house, two things that people in 1996 it never happened. so it's something like the
indicate that each sides if they have leverage and john boehner said earlier this week that he sees no need to raise taxes on upper income households and that would be bad for small businesses and showed no indication of a willingness to compromise. well, he needs to compromise ultimately on that issue. >> first of all, anything said prior to yesterday think which start with a big discount rate with anybody at any level that most americans have discounted them totally. that's the politicians must worry about is the massive discounting that's gone on in this country about washington and elected leadership and the need for people to restore themselves. and also i believe it's not typical but after election was an upsurge. lots of intelligent people in congress. but whether they collectively behave that way is not obvious. >> short-lived. >> short-lived, exactly. but the important thing here, and a little more positive because i don't doubt the hurdles that's been discussed and i doubt there will certainly be deal in a lame duck, but i think it is such on the economy that there will need to be
against many others. my good friend, senator john mccain -- and he really is my friend -- he and i have debated on the floor many times, but he said something that i want to quote from 2005 when there were criticisms of condoleezza rice who was being considered for the office of secretary of state. this is what senator mccain said -- "so i wonder why we're starting this new congress with a protracted debate about a foregone conclusion. i can only conclude we're doing this for no other reason because of lingering bitterness of the outcome of the election. we all have varying policy views, but the president in my view has a clear right to put into place the team he believes will serve him best." i agree with senator mccain's statement. let us get the facts together. let us find out what truly occurred before we point a finger of blame on any person in our government, let's make certain we do so with a knowledge of the facts and the evidence that we can gather. we owe it to the ambassador, his family and all the others who were either injured or lost their lives in this occurrence. i urge
for reelection. [laughter] john mccain and joe lieberman. the reason that joe came back -- what a wonderful lady she is. >> have you finished your rounds? >> a have to do that because i do appreciate this opportunity. i came to the congress in 1972 as a young freshman congressman. i served during the reagan years of the house. i was a partisan warrior. the house tends to make you a partisan warrior. everyday you get up and try to figure out how you can beat the enemy. after a while, you say you have to change your attitude. i'm going to try to make this place work for the things i believe in. so i started working on that. what happened over the years, our biggest enemy is time. >> 20% of the members of the house leaving their office. >> they leave their families back home, they don't know each other, when i first came to washington as a staff member for a democrat, i went into the office. my job was to pour the cheap bourbon and light the cigars. they played gin rummy. i've never heard of that before. >> are you suggesting that nancy -- nancy pelosi and john boehner don't do that? [applause] >>
matheson surviving utah is amazing. amazing. john barrow in georgia, yes, a republican candidate against john darrell was horrendous. when was the last time you heard a challenger who refused to debate the incumbent? [laughter] spent well, you've got to know yourself. >> i didn't think it was a bad decision and. i just said it said something about a challenger. so i think this is an additional problem. i think it's easier for moderate centrist democrats to appeal to republican voters, then it is for kind of moderate centrist republicans to appeal to democratic voters. but this is a problem, something we could argue. all right, let me take two minutes here and look at a little further and then will open up to qa and whatever, a lot of stuff to talk about. i think in the short term you are seeing some immediate republican? ability on taxes, and on dealing with sequestration and the fiscal cliff. and i talked to one republican be consoling the other day who said to me, you know, i think there's a chance that if obama wins comfortably with the electoral college and we underperform in the hou
over john mccain in 2008. so they wanted to lay out a strategy, get all the people to the polls. and so with the deepest is they invested very early on, a lot of money in state offices. the republicans scoffed at that at the very beginning, saying it was a waste of money and just wait until the end. and that is one of the big reasons the president was able to win. talk to multiple people who went and did fieldwork in ohio on the ground operating as volunteers who work in washington and work out for the final weeks. they said they were able, because they didn't have to drive so far between the fatalities to the offices to get, whether that was registration forms or getting people their checklist or whatever technology they were using, that made him a difference because they could talk to more people. these are hundreds of thousands of door knobs and phone calls they were able to do. so that's a big thing. then when you look at the exit polls, there's a couple things beyond the changing face of the nation, a changing attitude of the nation. when you think about what happened on election n
, recognize my former colleague in the house who came in, and so john, my colleague john fortier will introduce the panelists but i decided this morning taking a cue after both moses and david letterman i would ask the 10 questions that i would ask about this election, and not in any particular order, or in any priority but as i thought about the election, these were the questions, and they really do both a congressional in presidential races. one, the republicans to push lacking in the senate. was a case of good democratic candidates, bad republican candidates, or the message or the money, or all of the above? number two, why was there no similar shellacking of republicans in the house races? three, outside spending on races set records. but it did not seem to have made much of a difference in the outcomes. was at all a waste of money, or with out it with the outcomes have been materially different? number four, was this a status quo election as some have said, or is there something more profound going on with the electric? five, was there any mandate for anything coming out of
mcconnell of kentucky and other party leaders will include john cornyn of texas and he will succeed john kafeel as the minority whip and they've also announced today the national republican senatorial committee will be headed by rob portman and the culture will be the senator looked from texas, ted cruz from capitol hill. treasury secretary to m. geithner spoke yesterday about the fiscal cliff and the financial situation. he was part of the annual wall street journal ceo conference in the nation's conference. his comments are about a half-hour. >> the people in this room we told them before you got here and buy through the beat code 2-1 they do not expect a deal before we hit the cliff. no more information although there is a bit of a highlight of the dominican republic which we haven't figured out. [laughter] i think there is a lot of anxiety in this room about the fiscal clef. do you think that we are going to go over the cliff or are you confident your site can get a deal with the other side before we get there? >> we will have to see that there is every reason to believe that this is
wanted to tell you earlier but didn't have a chance. john kerry is my rent. i work so hard for him when he was running for president. i did everything i could to help him and he came very, very close. there's been no better legislature then i served with. he's been out front on issues dealing with climate change, and for structure, development and many other things. i don't know any conversations at the president or anyone in the white house has had within any conversation i've had with john kerry. he does not bring up has been secretary of anything. i'll do everything i can to help him if he is chosen. we feel very comfortable if in fact something does happen, we feel comfortable in massachusetts. i think i've heard he you how i feel about scott brown. [inaudible] what do you think his priority should be coming out? >> the president's priorities as he is outlined this campaign, to protect the mail class and small business. we are one vote away from that accomplishment -- been accomplished. all we have to decide the house of representatives web are built. they should do this to help the
a remarkable man as john indicated with an amazing list of accomplishments in a relatively short life. tripp, hopefully you're up there smiling on these efforts and somehow using your powers and spirits to motivate us to do more and to do it better. i'd like to say a few things about the effort. the idea to tap into some of our most experienced leaders in both the civilian, diplomatic, and military side, to get their views and their experiences before they tend to disappear into the recesses of their memory, so that we can collect a body of firsthand knowledge through the experience of many people who have done a lot of connecting the dots between security, something that i spent four decades plus involved with, and something that an aspect of this word "security" that i think is fundamental and very basic, and as i've mentioned to some of you who probably heard this in the past, but i'll say it again that during my career, my viewpoint has changed significantly in the understanding and definition of what security really is, and my current appreciation for it is that it's much more fundament
of effectiveness, but sometimes, you know, the pacs, the super pacs were not doing what, say, john cornyn might have wanted them to do, such as backing mourdock in indiana where the result occurred with donnelly winning, i think, by five points. so maybe, maybe we can get some reform. having said that, the influence of money is still pernicious, bad, and, you know, i would hope that reform of financial contributions would be something on, high up on the agenda in 2013, and i would hope we could get bipartisan support for at least the disclosure part of it, which many of our colleagues on the other side have been for in the past. >> one last from me and that's about revenue to avoid the fiscal cliff. you were talking about being heartened by boehner's comments yesterday where he said he wanted revenues to come from a fairer, sitsimpler, cleaner, tax code. because it matter to you -- does it matter where the revenues come from? >> yes, absolutely. >> why does it matter if. >> look, to me the most salient fact of our political economy in the last decade is that middle class incomes have declined.
, john mccain accused president obama of having plans to reduce the navy to 250 ships. obama has no such plan. he is totally oblivious to these forces. but there will be lucky to end this process at 250 ships. the cbo estimate of what's possible to happen is somewheres between 270 ships from the north end, and 170 ships on the south bend. that assumes -- the south end. that assumes the current cbo cost estimates for the cost of these ships is about right, and we know from past experience that cbo always has higher estimates for the navy but in reality even cbo is a little. so the lower band of cbo ship count numbers is extremely possible, given what's going to be happening to the navy shipbuilding as the navy shipbuilding budget experiences tresses things like the f-35, if they are crazy not to buy it, which will be much more expensive to acquire and operate than existing aircraft. and there's going to be a duel with the navy budget between the f-35 and shipbuilding. they're both going to end up losing. as this shrinkage occurs in the navy fleet, it will of course also be aging.
in ohio. recall back in 2004 when john kerry lost to george bush he would often say both publicly and to me on the floor of the senate, but for half the people that could fit in the ohio state stadium called the horseshoe i would be president today. it was a very narrow victory. i do think there were some reasons that are almost technical that some of you understand well. there are some folks here from silicon valley who are very good at social media and their turnout efforts, the democrats, were quite effective. if you look at the numbers, after the fact, the turnout for democrats among their base was better than we expected. i would say better than they expected based on their polling and their sampling. so, you know, they did a better job than we did getting their voters to the polls. mitt romney got fewer votes than john mccain in ohio and still came within two points. the technology included so-called orca system. some of you maybe read about that in the last couple days which was the republican get-out-the-vote technology to insure that we were targeting people getting to th
american strategy in afghanistan. i think we've got a pretty sensible military strategy. john podesta and i thought we didn't have a good political strategy or getting a good electoral outcome in 2014 and get an afghan government that is legitimate and supported by the afghan people. so you have a strong government to them to pass security responsibility for afghanistan in 2014. we've written about that. i think that's very important, political peace between on 2014. i think it's also very important for the administration to carry through on what it said it would do, which is to leave a substantial military force on the ground in afghanistan after 2014. i'm reluctant to do that. america has sacrificed so much blood and treasure there, but it's precisely because we have sacrificed so much blood and treasure that i think we have to have a presence there on the ground. because this cake is not going to be cooked by 2014. lastly, i do think we do not, still do not spend enough time focusing on pakistan. pakistan i think is like a bad marriage with no prospect for divorce. [laughter] there's no
has expired. mr. miller? >> both secretaries, in 1961 john f. kennedy said we'd put a man on the moon, eight years later america was there. we're talking about an integrated electronic health record by 2017. why could we put a man on the moon in eight years, and -- we're not starting from ground zero with the lek -- electronic health record. why is it taking so long? because it is so vital, especially secretary shinseki, to solving the backlog issue that exists in regards to disability claims. >> mr. chairman, i, i can't account for the previous ten years. i do know there's a history here. but let me just suggest that two large departments each having their own electronic health record which happened to be two very good, maybe the two best electronic health records in the country, and trying to bring that culture together to say we're going to have one, and it's entirely possible -- and i agree with you, it's not technology, it's leadership here between secretary panetta and i we have in the last year met five times, four times. we're going to meet again here in december, we're testif
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16